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  • Bruno Vellutini 11:37 on 2014/04/15 Permalink
    Tags: course   

    Submitted the application to the EMBO Light sheet microscopy course.

    Here are my motivation letter and CV.

    Curriculum Vitae: Bruno Cossermelli Vellutini

    Bruno C. Vellutini
    Thormøhlens Gate 55
    5008 Bergen
    Norway

    Mobile: +47 4508-9464
    Email: bruno.vellutini@sars.uib.no

    Summary of online presence
    ==========================

    Research interests
    ==================

    • Evolutionary developmental biology of marine invertebrates
    • Body patterning of larvae and evolution of life cycles
    • Gene regulatory networks and developmental diversity
    • Biodiversity and science outreach

    Education
    =========

    • 2011-Today: PhD Student @ Sars International Centre for Marine Molecular

    Biology and University of Bergen. Bergen, Norway.

    • 2006-2008: MSc Student @ Department of Zoology of the Institute of

    Biosciences of the University of São Paulo and Marine Biology Center of
    University of São Paulo. São Paulo, Brazil.

    • 2001-2005: BSc Student @ Institute of Biosciences of the University of São

    Paulo, Brazil.

    PhD thesis
    ==========

    • Title: Comparative development of spiralian larvae.
    • Supervisor: Andreas Hejnol
    • Summary: I am investigating the embryonic origin and fate of larval tissues

    in bryozoans, brachiopods, and nemerteans using microscopy and gene
    expression patterns to better understand the developmental diversity of
    Spiralia.

    MSc thesis
    ==========

    • Title: Development and reproductive cycle of the sea biscuit _Clypeaster

    subdepressus_ (Echinodermata: Echinoidea) from São Sebastião, SP

    • Supervisor: Alvaro E. Migotto
    • Summary: I documented the embryonic, larval, and juvenile development of a

    sea biscuit with emphasis on the morphology of post-metamorphic juveniles.
    Histological analysis was conducted to evaluate the gonadal maturation of
    adults during an year.

    Work experience
    ===============

    Positions
    ———

    • Jan-Feb 2014: Visiting Scholar @ Dunn Lab, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary

    Biology, Brown University. Providence, RI, USA. [Gene expression profiling of
    priapulid development and phylogenomics of acoels.]

    • 2011-Today: PhD Student @ Sars Centre and University of Bergen. Bergen,

    Norway. [Comparative developmental biology of larval body patterns in
    different spiralian species. In situ hybridization, antibody staining,
    confocal imaging, transcriptome]

    • 2010-2011: Editor, programmer, and front-end developer @ Marine Biology

    Center of University of São Paulo. São Sebastião, SP, Brazil. [Cifonauta is a
    metadata-driven image database for marine biology photos and videos.
    Development is based on Python using Django web framework and PostgreSQL
    database.] http://cifonauta.cebimar.usp.br/

    • 2006-2008: MSc Student @ Department of Zoology of the Institute of

    Biosciences of the University of São Paulo and Marine Biology Center of
    University of São Paulo. São Paulo and São Sebastião, SP, Brazil [Research on
    the development of echinoderms. Artificial fertilization and maintenance of
    embryos and larvae of echinoderms, still and video documentation with optical
    microscopy, histological techniques for tissue analysis.]

    • 2007-2008: Co-organizer and web developer @ Marine Biology Center of

    University of São Paulo. São Sebastião, SP, Brazil. [Itinerant photographic
    exhibit of marine organisms.] http://www.usp.br/cbm/oceano/

    • 2001-2004: Intern Researcher @ Evolutive Histophysiology Laboratory,

    Institute of Biomedical Sciences of University of São Paulo. São Paulo, SP,
    Brazil. [Innate immune response of Tropical and Antarctic animals.]

    Courses
    ——-

    • 2013: Marine Models in Evolution and Development. EMBO Practical Course.

    Fiskebäckskil, Sweden. [4 credits]

    • 2012: 8th MIC Confocal Microscopy Course. Department of Biomedicine,

    University of Bergen. Bergen, Norway [24h]

    • 2010: Concepts and Model Organisms in Regenerative Biology. Universidad de

    Chile and Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile. Santiago, Chile.
    Satellite course of Latin American Society for Developmental Biology 2010
    meeting. [76h]

    • 2008: Mini-course theoretical-practical on image processing and embryo

    manipulation. Institute of Biomedical Sciences (ICB) and Heart Institute
    (INCOR), University of São Paulo. São Paulo, SP, Brazil. During the II
    Meeting of Developmental Biology Students. [8h]

    • 2006: Comparative Invertebrate Embryology (BIOL536). Friday Harbor

    Laboratories, University of Washington. Friday Harbor, WA, USA. Summer
    Session A. [9 credits]

    • 2006: Larval Biology (BIOL533). Friday Harbor Laboratories, University of

    Washington. Friday Harbor, WA, USA. Summer Session B. [9 credits]

    Conferences, posters, and presentations
    —————————————

    • 2014: Annual Meeting of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology

    (SICB). Austin, Texas. Beyond boundaries: expression of “segment polarity”
    genes during larval lobe development in brachiopods. [oral presentation]

    • 2012: Bergen Marine Invertebrate Symposium. Bergen, Norway.
    • 2012: Scalidophora meeting. Bergen, Norway.
    • 2012: 4th Euro Evo Devo meeting. Lisbon, Portugal. Germ cell development in

    non-spiralian lophotrochozoans: insights from a bryozoan and a brachiopod.
    [poster presentation]

    • 2010: V International Meeting of the Latin American Society for Developmental

    Biology. Santa Cruz, Chile. Juvenile development of the sea biscuit
    _Clypeaster subdepressus_ (Echinodermata: Clypeasteroida). [poster
    presentation]

    • 2010: Workshop on Marine Diversity, FAPESP. São Paulo, SP, Brazil.
    • 2008: II Meeting of Developmental Biology Students. São Paulo, SP, Brazil.
    • 2008: 8th Larval Biology Symposium. Lisbon, Portugal. Larval and juvenile

    development of the sea biscuit _Clypeaster subdepressus_ (Echinodermata:
    Clypeasteroida). [oral presentation]

    • 2008: XXVII Brazilian Congress of Zoology. Curitiba, PR, Brazil. Embryonic

    and larval development of the sea biscuit _Clypeaster subdepressus_
    (Echinodermata: Clypeasteroida). Metamorphosis and post-metamorphic
    development of the sea biscuit _Clypeaster subdepressus_ (Echinodermata:
    Clypeasteroida). [2x poster presentation]

    • 2007: III International Symposium of Developmental Biology. Uberaba, MG,

    Brazil. Life cycle of the sea biscuit _Clypeaster subdepressus_
    (Echinodermata: Clypeasteroida). [poster presentation]

    • 2007: I Meeting of Developmental Biology of University of São Paulo. Ribeirão

    Preto, SP, Brazil. Development of the sea biscuit _Clypeaster subdepressus_.
    [oral presentation]

    • 2005: 15th International Society of Developmental Biologists Congress.

    Sydney, Australia.

    • 2005: 2nd International Meeting of the Latin American Society for

    Developmental Biology. Guarujá, SP, Brazil.

    Teacher assistant
    —————–

    • 2007: Diversity and evolution of marine invertebrates (9200001). Marine

    Biology Center of University of São Paulo. São Sebastião, SP, Brazil. [2nd
    Semester, 6 credits]

    • 2005: Invertebrates I (BIZ0210). Institute of Biosciences of University of

    São Paulo. São Paulo, SP, Brasil. [2nd Semester, 8 credits]

    Honors, awards, and scholarships
    ——————————–

    • 2013: SICB Symposium Funding Support. Company of Biologists. Society for

    Integrative and Comparative Biology Annual Meeting in Austin TX, USA 2014.
    Symposium: The cell’s view of animal body plan evolution.

    • 2011-Today: PhD Research Fellow. Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences.

    University of Bergen. Comparative development of spiralian larvae.

    • 2011: Winner, 3rd Place (Category 4: Photomicrographs). I Prêmio

    Fotografia-Ciência & Arte CNPq. Photomicrograph “Sea biscuit juvenile”
    http://www.cnpq.br/saladeimprensa/noticias/2011/0927b.htm

    • 2009: Winner, 5th Place. Nikon Small World Photomicrography Competition.

    Photomicrograph “Oral surface of a young sea star”
    http://nikonsmallworld.com/detail/year/2009/5

    • 2009: Honorable mention. Nikon Small World Photomicrography Competition.

    Photomicrograph “Pluteus larva of a sea biscuit”
    http://nikonsmallworld.com/detail/year/2009/32

    • 2008: Honorable mention. Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition.

    Photomicrograph “Larval skeleton of _Clypeaster subdepressus_
    http://www.olympusbioscapes.com/staticgallery/2008/hm58.html

    • 2007: Honorable mention, 2nd place. III Simpósio Internacional de Biologia do

    Desenvolvimento. Uberaba, MG, Brazil. Poster “Life cycle of the sea biscuit
    _Clypeaster subdepressus_”.

    • 2006-2008: MSc Scholarship. Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São

    Paulo (FAPESP). 2006/01898-7. Development and reproductive cycle of the sea
    biscuit _Clypeaster subdepressus_ (Echinodermata: Echinoidea) from São
    Sebastião, SP.

    • 2005: ISDB Travel Sponsorship Package. Company of Biologists. 15th

    International Society of Developmental Biologists Congress in Sydney,
    Australia.

    • 2002-2004: Scientific Initiation Scholarship. Conselho Nacional de

    Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico (PIBIC-CNPq). Characterization of
    the phagocytic activity of coelomocytes of the sea urchin _Lytechinus
    variegatus_ (Lamarck – 1816) in vivo and in vitro.

    Science Outreach
    —————-

    • 2010-Today: Cifonauta. Co-author, programmer, and front-end developer. CNPq.

    A metadata-driven image database for marine biology.
    http://cifonauta.cebimar.usp.br/

    • 2007-Today: Ocean: hidden life. Co-organizer and web developer. Fundo de

    Cultura e Extensão da Universidade de São Paulo. Itinerant photo exhibit of
    marine organisms. http://www.usp.br/cbm/oceano/

    Languages
    =========

    • Portuguese: Native language
    • English: Fluent [read/speak/write]

    Skills
    ======

    • Microscopy: light microscopy, confocal and SEM.
    • Imaging: photomicrography, video and timelapse, 3D reconstruction (ImageJ).
    • Molecular: gene cloning, in situ hybridization, antibody staining, transcriptome assembly.
    • Programming: python and bash, ImageJ macros, R (basics)}

    Journal articles
    ================

    Vellutini, B. C. & Migotto, A. E. Embryonic, larval, and juvenile development
    of the sea biscuit Clypeaster subdepressus (Echinodermata: Clypeasteroida).
    PLoS One 5, e9654 (2010). http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0009654

    Fukuzawa, A. H. et al. The role of hemocytes in the immunity of the spider
    Acanthoscurria gomesiana. Dev. Comp. Immunol. 32, 716–725 (2008).
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.dci.2007.11.002

    Silva, J. R. M. C. da et al. Unspecific immune response of antarctic ectotermic
    animals under polar temperatures. Oecologia Brasiliensis 11, 110–121 (2007).
    http://www.ppgecologia.biologia.ufrj.br/oecologia/index.php/oecologiabrasiliensis/article/viewArticle/124

    Cunha da Silva, J. R. M. et al. Microscopical study of experimental wound
    healing in Notothenia coriiceps (Cabeçuda) at 0 degrees C. Cell Tissue Res.
    321, 401–410 (2005). http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00441-005-1139-z

    Da Silva, J. R. M. C. et al. Kinetics of induced wound repair at 0°C in the
    Antarctic fish (Cabeçuda) Notothenia coriiceps. Polar Biol. 27, 458–465 (2004).
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00300-004-0611-7

    Magazine articles & others
    ==========================

    Migotto, A. E. & Vellutini, B. C. Cifonauta, um banco de imagens para a
    Biologia Marinha. Boletim Informativo da Associação Brasileira de Biologia
    Marinha 4, 7–12 (2011).

    Vellutini, B. C. Bolacha no mar? Que história é essa? Ciência Hoje das Crianças
    204, 8–11 (2009).

    Lindner, A., Migotto, A. E., Vellutini, B. C. & Silva-Neto, I. D. Vida
    escondida. O Telescópio 2–3 (2008).

    Vellutini, B. C. & Migotto, A. E. A Sea Biscuit’s Life. (2008).
    doi:10.4016/8126.01

    Background & skills
    ===================

    I am a PhD student at the Sars Centre for Marine Molecular Biology associated
    to the Molecular and Computational Biology Research School of University of
    Bergen, Norway. My ultimate research goal is to understand how changes in
    development are related to the evolution of animal forms. I am currently
    focused on the evolution of development and larval body patterns of non-model
    marine invertebrates, such as bryozoans, brachiopods, and priapulids.

    My academic background is based on invertebrate zoology and comparative
    embryology. Throughout my master’s project I gained some experience with light
    microscopy documentation techniques of live embryos using photography, video,
    and time-lapse imaging. I also experimented with 3D reconstruction
    reconstruction of larvae which triggered my interest for image processing and
    programming.

    One of my goals as a doctorate student is to broaden my approaches for evo-devo
    by learning different molecular techniques and more advanced imaging methods. I
    am currently using light and confocal microscopy to compare the morphology and
    gene expression patterns between different brachiopod larvae and I am tracing
    the cell lineage of a bryozoan using recordings from a 4D light microscope.

    This course fits my immediate and future research interests in several aspects.
    Since embryogenesis is an interactive process, comprehending the dynamics of
    development is paramount to fully understand its underlying mechanisms. Thus, I
    am looking forward to learn how light sheet microscopy can provide a platform
    for scrutinizing developmental processes. Also, the possibility of integrating
    live imaging and gene expression patterns is truly attractive to me.

    Likewise, I am particularly interested in getting familiar with state-of-art
    methods for cell lineage reconstruction, including computational methods and
    open source microscopy setups, and in discussing how they can be applied to
    non-model organisms.

    I believe the course will provide solid grounds for light sheet microscopy that
    are aligned with my career goals. It will be a great opportunity to learn,
    collaborate, and get stimuli for new research ideas which will positively
    impact my future work.

    Proposed experiment
    ===================

    Spiral cleavage is the remarkably conserved iconic pattern of embryonic cell
    divisions and developmental fate map characteristic of a major branch of
    invertebrates, the Spiralia. In a typical spiralian embryo, the anteroposterior
    axis is established in the zygote while the dorsoventral axis is specified
    either by early asymmetric cleavage (unequally-cleaving species) or by cellular
    interactions at the 32-cell stage of equally-cleaving species. In the latter, a
    vegetal cell (macromere) intrudes the blastocoel and contacts the apical cells
    (micromeres). After the interaction, the macromere becomes an embryonic
    organizer and induces the dorsoventral polarity of the embryo from that moment
    onwards.

    Even though such key event in spiralian development was described almost forty
    years ago there is no real-time imaging depicting these cellular interactions.

    More interestingly, the dorsoventral axis determination in spiralians seems to
    be dependent on the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascade.
    The MAPK pathway is active in the organizer cell in equally-cleaving molluscs
    and embryos treated with an inhibitor of the pathway become radialized (i.e.,
    fail to establish the dorsoventral axis).

    What is really happening at the onset of dorsoventral axis specification in
    terms of developmental dynamics? Can we further understand the role of MAPK
    pathway when comparing cellular interactions under normal and experimental
    conditions?

    Approaching these questions requires live imaging with a high spatial and
    temporal resolution. Thus, light sheet microscopy is a promising technique to
    accomplish these recordings with live spiralian embryos and reveal the
    mechanisms of dorsoventral axis specification of spiral cleavage.

    The experiment has two objectives:

    1. Describe the interactions between macromeres and micromeres during
    dorsoventral specification of a spiralian embryo.
    2. Compare normal development (above) to the developmental dynamics of embryos
    treated with an inhibitor of the MAPK pathway.

    An equally-cleaving annelid or mollusc where the macromere interaction is
    expected to occur would be the ideal animal model. However, I am excited to try
    these experiments with the bryozoan species that I am working with. Although
    there are logistic challenges that need to be solved like the transport and
    maintenance of the animals in sea water. A third alternative is using an
    unequally-cleaving spiralian (e.g., _Platynereis_) to verify the effects of
    MAPK inhibition which would focus the experiment on the second objective. The
    development in these animals is relatively fast and the recordings would only
    require early stages, so the comparison between different treatments could be
    done within the course period.

     
  • Bruno Vellutini 20:11 on 2014/04/14 Permalink
    Tags: course   

    Wrote the motivation letter for the light sheet microscopy course.

     
  • Bruno Vellutini 20:10 on 2014/04/13 Permalink
    Tags: course   

    Wrote the proposed experiment for the light sheet microscopy course.

     
  • Bruno Vellutini 12:12 on 2013/05/15 Permalink
    Tags: course   

    Submitted EMBO course application (MAMED 2013) 

    Abstract

    Also at Google Docs.

    Expression of engrailed and wnt1 demarcates the anterior lobe boundary in a brachiopod larva
    Bruno C. Vellutini and Andreas Hejnol
    Sars International Centre for Marine Molecular Biology, Bergen, Norway

    Segmentation of the body along the anterior-posterior (AP) axis is a characteristic feature of arthropods, annelids, and chordates. It is a long standing question whether segmentation had a common evolutionary origin or if it has evolved multiple times in bilaterians. Regulatory mechanisms of segmentation can be surprisingly conserved across taxa (e.g., segment polarity genes), but can also vary even within related groups (e.g., different annelids). Brachiopods are sessile spiralians with a bivalved shell closely related to annelids, molluscs, and nemerteans. Despite having an unsegmented adult body, the larval body of many brachiopods is divided in two or three lobes disposed along the AP axis. They are denominated apical, mantle, and pedicle lobes and define an anterior and a posterior boundary in the trilobed larvae. The objective of this study is to verify if segment polarity genes have a role in the development of the larval lobes of brachiopods. Therefore we have cloned and performed in situ hybridizations of engrailed, wnt genes, and components of the Hedgehog pathway in different developmental stages of the brachiopod Terebratalia transversa. We detected transverse stripes of wnt1 and engrailed transcripts adjacent to each other at the anterior boundary of the larva. wnt1 is localized along the posterior-most region of the apical lobe and engrailed along the anterior-most region of the mantle lobe. This expression is similar to the patterns found at parasegment and segment boundaries of arthropods and annelids, respectively. Thus, our preliminary results suggest that engrailed and wnt1 are involved in forming and maintaining the anterior boundary of T. transversa larvae. Succeeding functional experiments will help to clarify the degree of conservation of such segmentation mechanism during brachiopod development.

    Motivation

    Also at Google Docs.

    Dear admissions committee,

    I am a PhD student in Andreas Hejnol’s group at the Sars Centre for Marine Molecular Biology and associated to the Molecular and Computational Biology Research School of University of Bergen, Norway. My general research goal is to understand how changes in organism development are related to the evolution of form in metazoans. I am interested in evo-devo of less studied marine invertebrates especially concerning the evolution of larval body patterns.

    It was the work of the 19th century Russian biologist Élie Metchnikoff that triggered my current interest for marine invertebrates and developmental processes. His career was based on comparative embryological studies of invertebrates and on a compelling evolutionary thinking which influenced me during my undergraduate studies. This early contact to exciting evolutionary questions involving the evolution of multicellularity and ontogenetic processes directed my attention towards evolutionary developmental biology. Since then, the interface between evolution and development became the main axis of my academic pursuit.

    Before starting my master’s thesis I had the opportunity to take two courses at Friday Harbor Laboratories. The practical contact with the wide diversity of embryonic and larval forms of marine invertebrates as well as the enlightening discussions about evolution and development had a major influence on my project. For my master’s thesis I investigated the developmental origins of the morphology of sea biscuits and sand dollars. I established a detailed morphological description from fertilization to late juvenile stages of a tropical sea biscuit species with emphasis on the juvenile patterning. During the project I gained experience with documentation techniques for live samples with light microscopy using photography, video, and timelapse imaging. I also experimented with 3D reconstruction which sparkled my interest for image processing and programming.

    Having a strict morphological background I felt the necessity of expanding my approaches for evo-devo research with molecular techniques and gene expression studies as well as more advanced imaging techniques. In my PhD position at the Hejnol Lab I am working with the evolution of larval body patterns using a comparative approach with non-model marine invertebrates such as bryozoans, brachiopods, and nemerteans. My project includes a survey for segmentation mechanisms in brachiopod larvae and identifying the origin and fate of pluripotent larval tissues in different spiralian species. I am mainly using gene expression patterns of candidate genes and confocal imaging.

    The course “Marine animal models in evolution & development” fits my immediate research interests in several aspects. Because of my inclination for comparative studies developing a solid set of skills for establishing molecular techniques and genomic resources of new organisms is paramount. Getting insights about in situ hybridization and antibody staining as well as the analysis of gene expression patterns and gene regulatory networks will be extremely useful for my current PhD projects. I also have a strong interest for experimenting with more advanced imaging techniques, specially SPIM, since they make a crucial aspect of development accessible to us, the dynamics of ontogenetic processes.

    Other topics offered that I want to incorporate to my research repertoire, but have no previous experience include functional approaches and its many techniques such as microinjection of embryos, gene knockdown, transgenesis, and other reverse genetics methods. Having a primer during the course will certainly be of good value for developing future projects.

    Finally, I am excited to explore the fjord diversity and particularly attracted by the scheduled discussions which will provide grounds and stimuli for new research ideas and positively impact my work. This EMBO Practical Course is definitely aligned with my career goals and is a perfect opportunity to learn and be up-to-date with several state-of-art methods in evo-devo.

    Best regards,

    Bruno

    CV

    Sent this one.

    Referees contacts

    Andreas Hejnol
    Group leader
    Sars International Centre for Marine Molecular Biology
    andreas.hejnol@sars.uib.no
    Tlf (47) 55 58 43 28
    Fax (47) 55 58 43 05

    Alvaro Esteves Migotto
    Professor
    Marine Biology Center of University of São Paulo
    aemigott@usp.br
    Tlf (55 12) 3862 8416
    Fax (55 12) 3862 8454
    I’m searching for developmental data and patterns of marine invertebrates which may add
    new insights on how and why metazoan evolved.

    Registration

    You have successfully submitted an abstract!
    You have been issued the following login details:
    User-ID: 38
    Password: n9edk9z7

     
  • Bruno Vellutini 08:00 on 2012/01/31 Permalink
    Tags: , course   

    8th MIC confocal microscopy course at the Dept. of Biomedicine, University of Bergen 

    Confocal course: 31st of January – 3rd of February 2012. Program: Program and info 8th confocal course 2012

     
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